Category: General

Someone you should know: Danilo Coité, MD, IPI’s CEO

Someone you should know: Danilo Coité, MD, IPI’s CEO

Just over a month ago Independence Plus, Inc. (IPI) brought Danilo Coité, MD, onboard as the company’s new CEO to help drive success and growth while continuing the mission and passion for providing complex patient care in the home. Dr. Coité brings a unique blend of medical and business expertise and looks forward to embarking on projects aimed at developing IPI’s brand and helping to establish new and innovative ideas to embrace opportunities that lie ahead. Earlier this week we asked him a few questions to allow all of us to get to know him better.

Let’s get social!

Let’s get social!

There is no doubt that social media is an important communication vehicle for individuals and businesses alike. At Independence Plus, Inc., we use it to help others experience what healthcare at home means to us.

A new year and another opportunity for new grad nurses!

A new year and another opportunity for new grad nurses!

Happy New Year from all of us at Independence Plus, Inc. (IPI)! As we begin 2017 we are grateful for our patients and their families and we look forward to another year of providing people with complex medical and respiratory needs the opportunity to live fulfilling lives at home. One aspect of IPI that makes us very proud is our commitment to hiring newly-graduated nurses. We are kicking off the year with the 16th Cohort for our Home Nursing Residency, a unique employment opportunity for RN’s and LPN’s with less than one year of experience.

Leadership changes at Independence Plus, Inc.

Leadership changes at Independence Plus, Inc.

Independence Plus, Inc. (IPI) is pleased to announce an executive leadership change that will help drive the success and growth of the company while continuing our mission and passion for providing complex patient care in the home. After 30 years at the helm of the company she founded, IPI’s President & CEO Tamara M. Müller will transition to a new role in order to dedicate more time to outside projects primarily related to chronic pulmonary disease management and innovative medical devices. She will remain IPI’s Chairman of the Board.

Giving Thanks for Family Caregivers

Giving Thanks for Family Caregivers

Family caregivers are an essential component of the work that Independence Plus, Inc. (IPI) does to provide the best possible care for our medically complex, ventilator-dependent patients. While their job is not always easy, the devotion they show can make a profound difference in the lives of their loved ones. Kayla and her husband Kevin are two such people. Their son KJ was born just shy of 26 gestational weeks. He spent a year and a half in the hospital, before coming home with IPI’s skilled hourly home nursing in May 2015.

Educating our nurses on cardiopulmonary dynamics and the principals and benefits of Percussive Ventilation

Educating our nurses on cardiopulmonary dynamics and the principals and benefits of Percussive Ventilation

Almost three years ago Independence Plus, Inc (IPI) began an education and training initiative known as ‘IPI Connect’. Administrative and field clinicians are invited to monthly IPI Connect meetings to help build a more connected professional network for our clinicians and offer open discussions on topics directly related to the care we are responsible for delivering to our medically complex, ventilator-dependent adult and pediatric patients. To allow more of our nurses to participate, we are providing a wrap-up of each topic via our blog.

Preserving Your Moneymaker: Nurse Edition

Preserving Your Moneymaker: Nurse Edition

A great friend of mine sent me a wonderful message attached with a photo titled “Anatomy of a Nurse.” It included “a mind that’s always assessing,” “warm heart,” “warped senses of humor,” “eyes that have seen it all.” It also included “aching back,” “empty stomach”, “full bladder,” “tired feet,” and “dry, chapped hands.” As I continued to read, although my friend was thoughtful with great intentions, the nurse in me said “wait a minute, that’s not a good anatomy.” It is not okay to be hungry, have back pain, nor a full bladder. We would not tell our patients that those things were “okay.” Most of us would use these as teaching opportunities and educate our patients on the risks and benefits, as well as alternatives to positive self-care. So why do we think it is acceptable for us?